From Planned Parenthood Northern California Action Fund — Capitol Day

Please join us Monday, June 11 for Capitol Day.In Washington D.C., Congress and the Administration continue to be hostile to the health care needs of all Americans. In Sacramento on June 11, we have the chance to fight back.

You’ve continued to stand up, march, make calls, and share your stories with local representatives. Your support and efforts make a difference and we need to continue to ensure that our elected leaders in California have our back. The vital services that Planned Parenthood health centers provide must remain available to Californians regardless of age, background, gender, insurance or immigration status.  We need your help. Will you join us for Capitol Day on June 11?

Activities will include a rally on the Capitol steps, lobby visits, an advocacy fair and more! Transportation, food, and materials will be provided.

More details will follow soon.

Sign up at: www.weareplannedparenthoodaction.org

We look forward to standing side by side with you!

In Solidarity,

Gilda Gonzales
President/CEO
Planned Parenthood Northern California Action Fund

 

Lucie Brandon 1933 – 2018

It is with great sadness that we note the passing of one of the founders and a past president of Contra Costa NOW, Lucie Brandon McKamey.  Lucie was a tireless worker for women’s rights and was very active in the ERA campaign in the 1970s. She attended the ERA march in Washington, D.C., a highlight of her life.

A memorial service will be held at Heather Farm’s Lakeside Room on Saturday, June 9, at 2:00 p.m.  All NOW members are welcome to attend to celebrate the life of this remarkable woman.

National Organization for Women Press Release

Leading Feminist Organizations to Hold ‘Enough is Enough’ Summit and Congressional Briefing April 25, 2018 in Washington, DC

 

In Cooperation with Representative Lois Frankel, Chair of the Democratic Women’s Working Group
Featuring Invited Members of Congress and Other Special Guest Speakers

 

 

April 11, 2018 

WASHINGTON – On Wednesday, April 25, 2018, leading feminist organizations will gather in Washington to stand in solidarity with survivors of sexual harassment and sexual assault and say: “Enough is Enough.” Coalition partner groups including the National Organization for Women (NOW), Feminist Majority, National Congress of Black Women, UNITE HERE, Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, Legal Momentum, and National Council of Jewish Women will present a series of panel discussions featuring women from all walks of life. Advocates, survivors, litigators, legislators, agency officials, heads of prominent organizations, union leaders and activists will join together and discuss various facets of sexual violence in workplaces across industries. The Enough is Enough Summit and Congressional Briefing will address needed improvements in law and policy, recommendations for the most effective methods in preventing and dealing with sexual violence, and strategies to craft a more survivor-centric legal system.

WHAT: Enough is Enough Summit & Congressional Briefing

Discussion Topics to Include:

  • Strengthening Federal Law and Policy
  • Model State Laws and Workplace Policies
  • Preventing Retaliation, Fighting the Backlash and Aiding Survivors
  • Countering Misogyny and Changing the Culture

WHO: Convening Leaders and Program Participants:

  • Toni Van Pelt, President, National Organization for Women (NOW)
  • Eleanor Smeal, Co-Founder & President, Feminist Majority
  • Dr. E. Faye Williams, National President, National Congress of Black Women
  • Maria Elena Durazo, General Vice President, UNITE HERE
  • Mónica Ramírez, President, Alianza Nacional de Campesinas
  • Carol Baldwin Moody, Chief Operating Officer, Legal Momentum
  • Nancy Kaufman, CEO, National Council of Jewish Women

Confirmed Speakers and Panelists:

  • Rep. Lois Frankel, Chair of the Democratic Women’s Working Group
  • June Barrett, Organizer, National Domestic Workers Alliance, We Dream in Black & Miami Workers Center
  • Gaylynn Burroughs, Policy Director, Feminist Majority
  • Sunu Chandy, Legal Director, National Women’s Law Center, Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund
  • Jess Davidson, Interim Executive Director, End Rape on Campus (EROC)
  • Chai Feldblum, Commissioner, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
  • Anne Hedgepeth, Interim Vice President for Public Policy and Government Relations, American Association of University Women
  • Debra Katz, Founding Partner, Katz, Marshall & Banks, LLP
  • Delegate Ariana B. Kelly, Montgomery County, President, Women Legislators of Maryland
  • Sonia Ossorio, President, New York City NOW and NY State NOW
  • Maya Raghu, Director of Workplace Equality and Senior Counsel, National Women’s Law Center
  • Carol Robles-Roman, National Board Member of NOW and Co-President, ERA Coalition
  • Nerexeda Soto, Server and Barista, Long Beach, UNITE HERE Local 11
  • Kathy Spillar, Executive Editor, Ms. Magazine
  • Gillian Thomas, Director, American Civil Liberties Union, Women’s Rights Project
  • Mily Treviño-Sauceda, Activist, Alianza Nacional de Campesinas
  • Deborah Vagins, Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Research, American Association of University Women

For an updated schedule of events and speakers, please visit http://bit.ly/EnoughSummit2018.

WHEN: Thursday, April 25, 2018; 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

WHERE: Capitol Visitors Center Congressional Auditorium & Atrium, CVC 200 First St. NE (at East Capitol St.), Washington, DC 20515

MEDIA: For media interested in attending the event, please contact Daniella Burgos at dburgos@scottcircle.com; 202.695.8221.

For media interested in interviews with any of the convening partners or speakers, please contact Dee Donavanik, ddonavanik@scottcircle.com; 202.695.8229.

GUEST RSVP: For more information on the Enough is Enough campaign and to RSVP for the Summit, please click here (free to attend).

 

EBWPA June 2018 Primary Election Endorsements

EBWPA

EBWPA Endorsements For June 2018 Primary Election

Thank you to all of the candidates who presented at our meeting on Sunday, March 18, 2018 and to our members that attended and voted. Candidates must meet a 60% threshold of present voting members to receive the EBWPA endorsement. Below, you will find the results from the meeting.

The following candidates and measures have received the endorsement of EBWPA:

U.S. Congress, District 13: Barbara Lee

Alameda County Board of Supervisors, District 3: Wilma Chan

Alameda County Office of Education, Superintendent: L. Karen Monroe

Alameda County Office of Education, District 4: Aisha Knowles

Alameda County District Attorney: Nancy E. O’Malley

Contra Costa County District Attorney: Diana Becton

Assembly District 15: No Position

California Governor: Delaine Eastin

Assembly District 16: Rebecca Bauer-Kahan

Alameda County Auditor Controller/ Clerk Recorder: Irella Blackwood

Alameda County Superior Court Judge, #11: Tara Flanagan

Measures

  • Early Childhood Education: Support
  • Regional Measure 3: Support

Per our bylaws, in order to receive the EBWPA endorsement a candidate must declare their agreement to/support for our organization’s bottom line issues and meet a 60% support threshold of present voting members. EBWPA only endorses pro-choice women candidates and measures that directly affect the wellbeing of women in our community.

15 Women Who Were Overlooked by History — Until Now

6 women

15 Women Who Were Overlooked by History — Until Now

It was not customary, in New York City during the late 19th century, for a woman to accompany a man to a construction site. Petticoats tended to get in the way of physical work.

But when Washington A. Roebling, the chief engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, fell ill with the bends, it was his wife, Emily Warren Roebling, who stepped in. She managed, liaised and politicked among city officials, workers and her husband on his sick bed to complete the world’s first steel-wire suspension bridge. In 1883, she would be the first person to cross the new bridge — carrying a rooster for good luck.

Roebling is one of 15 women featured in Overlooked, a project we launched today, in which we are revisiting 167 years of New York Times history to write the obituaries for women who never got them, but should have.

Ida B Wells

It is said that obituary writing is not about death, but life — the last word, so to speak, on a person’s time alive. A good obituary is a carefully crafted final testament to a mark left on society, culture, history, whether good or bad.

But who gets remembered — and how — has always been a matter of judgment. And so to look back at obituaries over time is to learn not only about lives lived, but about how society assessed those lives. In some cases, a gap is obvious in who was, and wasn’t, deemed worthy of an obituary.

Since 1851, The New York Times has published thousands of obituaries, for heads of state and Nobel Peace Prize winners, but also for the inventors of Stove Top dressing and the namer of the Slinky. The vast majority of those obituaries chronicled the lives of men, mostly white ones; even in the last two years, just more than one in five of our subjects were female.

Among the women who did not receive obituaries are Charlotte Bronte, who wrote “Jane Eyre,” and Ada Lovelace, a gifted mathematician who was the world’s first computer programmer. They were Mary Outerbridge, who brought tennis to the United States, and Qiu Jin, a Chinese feminist, author and revolutionary. Also Ida B. Wells, the muckraking journalist and leading voice of the anti-lynching movement (her wedding, however, did receive front-page attention).

It is said that obituary writing is not about death, but life — the last word, so to speak, on a person’s time alive. A good obituary is a carefully crafted final testament to a mark left on society, culture, history, whether good or bad.

But who gets remembered — and how — has always been a matter of judgment. And so to look back at obituaries over time is to learn not only about lives lived, but about how society assessed those lives. In some cases, a gap is obvious in who was, and wasn’t, deemed worthy of an obituary.

Since 1851, The New York Times has published thousands of obituaries, for heads of state and Nobel Peace Prize winners, but also for the inventors of Stove Top dressing and the namer of the Slinky. The vast majority of those obituaries chronicled the lives of men, mostly white ones; even in the last two years, just more than one in five of our subjects were female.

Among the women who did not receive obituaries are Charlotte Bronte, who wrote “Jane Eyre,” and Ada Lovelace, a gifted mathematician who was the world’s first computer programmer. They were Mary Outerbridge, who brought tennis to the United States, and Qiu Jin, a Chinese feminist, author and revolutionary. Also Ida B. Wells, the muckraking journalist and leading voice of the anti-lynching movement (her wedding, however, did receive front-page attention).

Qui Jing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some women, by contrast, received obituaries that now seem comically inadequate.

When Frida Kahlo died, in 1953, she was identified first as the “wife of Diego Rivera.” Susan B. Anthony was noted in 1906 to have “possessed a figure of medium size” and “a firm but rather pleasing face.” Harriet Tubman’s 1913 death merited only 132 words (though short obituaries were customary at the time).

Emily Warren Roebling, the Woman Behind the Man Who Built the Brooklyn BridgeRoebling
She was not an engineer. But she was instrumental to the construction of the great engineering feat.

 

 

 

 

Ida B. Wells, Who Took on Racism in the Deep South With Powerful Reporting on LynchingsWells
Wells is considered by historians to have been the most famous black woman in the United States during her lifetime, even as she was dogged by prejudice.

 

 

 

 

Diane Arbus Called Her Portraits ‘A Secret About a Secret’Diabe Arbus
A daughter of privilege, she photographed those on the outside, and her work has been hailed as brave and reviled as freakish.

 

 

 

 

 

Marsha P. Johnson, a Transgender Pioneer and ActivistJohnson
When she died at 46, under murky circumstances, Johnson was mourned by many friends but her death did not attract much notice in the mainstream press.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos from the Contra Costa Women’s March

 

Women's March 14 Women's March 13 Women's March 12 Women's March 10 Women's March 11 Women's March 9 Women's March 8 Women's March 6 Women's March 7 Women's March 5 Women's March 4 Women's March 3 Women's March 2 Women's March 1

 

Holiday Party with STAND!

As part of our community outreach we collected donations of items for women’s shelters in our county through STAND! For Families Free of Violence.  Items included women’s underclothes, women’s socks, children’s underclothes, children’s socks, adult pajamas, child pajamas, diapers, hygiene supplies (deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrushes, shampoo, tampons, pads, hairbrushes, bath soap-liquid, hand soap-liquid), bed sheets, towels, pillows, back packs w/school supplies, journals and pens.

Rhonda, director of STAND!, raised our awareness of how STAND! operates and the various problems it faces.  Funding is mainly through grants, then donations.

Below is a photo of the Board members in front of a table with various donations.

Stand Party

 

Photos From Our Paint Nite Event: Contra Costa NOW Stands with Planned Parenthood

 

PaintNiteKB13 Katia and 1515 PaintNiteKB12 PaintNiteKB11 PaintNiteKB10 PaintNiteKB9 PaintNiteKB8 PaintNiteKB7 PaintNiteKB6 PaintNiteKB5 PaintNiteKB4 PaintNiteKB3 PaintNiteKB2 PaintNiteKB1 PaintNiteKB_ButtonsPaintNiteKB_Artists

 

Photos from the Garden Party 8/19/2017

Photos from our garden party

What a wonderful turnout!  We had raffle prizes, a feminist quiz, suffragette video, delicious food, and good company.

Nancy and Joe

Nancy B and Joe

 Mary, state board rep and past president with our newest member Olin.  Olin adores Mary! and vice versa!

Mary and Olin

Laura and Jim

Laura and Jim

Chapter members enjoying conversation

Karen S and chapter members

 Kathy and Dorothy

Kathy and Dorothy

Erika, president; Katia, action committee chairperson and Olin’s mom; and Adel from Planned Parenthood

Erika_Katia_Adel

Darnelle and Lesley, longtime members

Darnelle_Erika_Leslie

 Current Board Members:  Kathy, treasurer; Erika, President; Nancy, VP Action; Phyllis, VP Public Relations; Karen VP Membership

Board Members

Planned Parenthood Capitol Day

Contra Costa NOW members, behind the desk of Gavin Newsom, Lieutenant Governer, in support of Planned Parenthood Capitol Day, #CAStandsWithPP.

gaven newsoms desk

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